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Stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination at the intersection of race and gender: an intersectional theory primer

Image credit: RF._.studio at pexels.com

Stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination at the intersection of race and gender: an intersectional theory primer

Abstract

The incorporation of intersectionality within social psychology is becoming an increasingly common practice. From the hypotheses we generate to the methods we employ, as well as the analyses we run and the theories we use, researchers are moving away from studying social identities in isolation. By studying the interactional and emergent properties of multiple identities that go beyond the sum of identities, as well as understanding the complex nature of power and privilege, social psychologists can better understand processes such as stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Yet it can be difficult for researchers to know exactly where to begin. This review serves as a primer for conducting intersectionally-informed research within social psychology, using the intersection of race and gender within the United States as a case study. We first describe the history of intersectional research in psychology, noting its barriers to implementation. Next, we review three classes of intersectionally-informed models — intersectional perception, experience, and treatment — and offer suggestions for future research as well as ways researchers can incorporate the model within their work.

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Sa-kiera T. J. Hudson, PhD
Assistant Professor

My research interests include social identities, power, hierarchy, and intersectionality.